Posters about Khojaly genocide appear in U.S. cities (PHOTO)

Azerbaijan, Baku, Feb.22 / Trend, E.Tarivediyeva /

The national public awareness campaign about Khojaly genocide is being led by the Azerbaijan America Alliance in the U.S., the webiste Heraldonline reported on Friday.

The campaign started on Feb.18, when several multimedia projects aimed at educating U.S. citizens about the Khojaly genocide were launched.

According to the report, the Khojaly posters - with the headline, "Khojaly...A Human Tragedy Against Azerbaijan" -- are appearing currently in at least 9 different metro stations in the D.C. area.

"Along with the awareness campaign in the metro stations, both mobile billboards and mobile projections with advertisements remembering the anniversary of Khojaly have been going around D.C. In addition to the stationary posters, mobile billboards and mobile projections of the posters on buildings have been occurring from one end of D.C. to the other, from Chinatown on the Verizon Center, to Dupont and Georgetown M Street buildings, and near Capitol Hill, K Street, and the White House. The Khojaly public awareness campaign will continue in Washington through the rest of February and has begun appearing in New York City this week as well," the report says.

The National Mall and Union Station in Washington and Times Square and the United Nations in New York are several of the many heavily trafficked and iconic locations targeted by the campaign.

The public awareness campaign will last for several weeks, the report says.

On Feb. 25-26 February, 1992, Armenian occupation forces together with the 366th infantry regiment of Soviet troops stationed in Khankendi (previously called Stepanakert) committed an act of genocide towards the population of Azerbaijani Khojaly town.

Some 613 people were killed including 63 children, 106 women and 70 old men. A total of 1,000 civilians were disabled during the genocide. Eight families were killed, 130 children lost one parent and 25 lost both. Additionally, 1275 innocent residents were taken hostage, while the fate of 150 remains unknown.

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