Principles of settling Nagorno-Karabakh conflict clear, Azerbaijani deputy FM says

Photo: Principles of settling Nagorno-Karabakh conflict clear, Azerbaijani deputy FM says
 / Nagorno-karabakh conflict

Baku, Azerbaijan, July 9

By Sabina Ahmadova- Trend:

There are concrete issues in the settlement of Armenian-Azerbaijani Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, and clear principles for their solution, Azerbaijani Deputy Foreign Minister, Araz Azimov told reporters on July 9.

Azimov made the remarks commenting on a statement made by the OSCE Minsk Group U.S. Co-Chair James Warlick on the status quo in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

Earlier, the OSCE Minsk Group's U.S. Co-chair James Warlick tweeted that the status quo in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is "increasingly dangerous".

Araz Azimov said Azerbaijan has repeatedly stated that it is ready for negotiations to achieve a progress in the solution of problems.

The deputy foreign minister noted that Azerbaijan's proposals in these negotiations are known.

Azimov said that firstly it is necessary to take specific measures, such as the agenda, chronological order and parallel measures for liberation of the occupied territories, transfer of control over the occupied territories to Azerbaijan with the withdrawal of forces from these lands, restoration of local authorities, and improvement work.

He said only after this it will be possible to work on the steps for a peaceful co-existence.

"After the return of Azerbaijani population of Nagorno-Karabakh, both communities will be learning to live together again, cooperation will be established, and it will be possible to discuss the political issues after this stage. If that's what James Warlick means, then I agree with him," Azimov said.

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. As a result of the ensuing war, in 1992 Armenian armed forces occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and seven surrounding districts.

The two countries signed a ceasefire agreement in 1994. The co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group, Russia, France and the U.S. are currently holding peace negotiations.

Armenia has not yet implemented the U.N. Security Council's four resolutions on the liberation of the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding regions.

Edited by S.I.

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