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Political scientist: Armenia ruins remaining prestige by trying to legitimize illegal structures

Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict Materials 14 January 2011 16:05
Armenia stroke another blow to the remnants of its prestige by trying to legitimize the recognition of illegal structures, Azerbaijani political analyst and Trend Expert Council member Fikret Sadikhov said today. He made the statement while commenting on Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan’s decree on the amendments to the law on international treaties.
Political scientist: Armenia ruins remaining prestige by trying to legitimize illegal structures

Azerbaijan, Baku, Jan. 14 / Trend S.Agayeva/

Armenia stroke another blow to the remnants of its prestige by trying to legitimize the recognition of illegal structures, Azerbaijani political analyst and Trend Expert Council member Fikret Sadikhov said today. He made the statement while commenting on Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan's decree on the amendments to the law on international treaties.

Sargsyan signed the amendments to the law, which was adopted by parliament on Dec. 17, Novosti-Armenia reported. The amendments regulate the relations between Armenia and unrecognized territories in matters of peace, human rights, and humanitarian, financial and economic assistance. The bill states that unrecognized territories may be a party to an international treaty.

Last year put an end to Armenian euphoria about any recognition of Nagorno Karabakh as a state, the analyst said. Such illusions burst like a soap bubble, he added.

"Naturally, in this situation, the Armenian side is trying to demonstrate to its public and the diaspora that it may, if necessary, recognize these self-proclaimed republics and try to engage them in some sort of contact," Sadikhov said. "But everything is so virtual and improbable that it causes not bitterness, but rather irony and laughter."

Sadikhov said if Armenia recognizes Nagorno Karabakh, or Transdniester or Abkhazia in the future, "absolutely nothing will change," and no legal changes will be made to international law. This is obvious to the international community, he said.

"There is no country or international organization in the world that does not recognize Azerbaijan's territorial integrity. Naturally, it's annoying to Armenia, and Yerevan is taking these steps in the hope that by recognizing the independence of some secessionist formations, perhaps, it will comfort its hopes and calm the more nationalist circles in Armenia," he added.

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. Armenian armed forces have occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan since 1992, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and 7 surrounding districts.

Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a ceasefire agreement in 1994. The co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group - Russia, France, and the U.S. - are currently holding the peace negotiations.

Armenia has not yet implemented the U.N. Security Council's four resolutions on the liberation of the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding regions.

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