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U.S. not interested in establishing democracy in Middle East

Politics Materials 19 May 2011 20:46
U.S. not interested in establishing democracy in Middle East

Azerbaijan, Baku, May 19 /Trend, A.Tagiyeva/

The U.S. authorities are not interested in bringing democracy to the Middle East, since it can lead to a change in foreign policy of the region countries, while the U.S. strives to preserve the existing situation, which helps it carry out its plans in the region, said Middle East expert at Chatham House (British Royal Institute of International Relations), Nadim Shenadi.

"Democracy in the Middle East is not something to which the U.S. government aspires. They want only one thing - not to lose control over the Arab world," Shenadi told Trend by telephone from London.

The expert believes that U.S. policy was aimed at cooperation with some Arab leaders, who could keep the situation in their countries under control through their tough policies.

"These heads of Arab countries helped the U.S. implement many projects in the Arab region," he added.

Shehadi said that such a policy is also supported by the fact that the U.S. authorities did not immediately respond to ongoing developments in the Arab countries, which in turn led to deepening of the situation in these countries.

"We still do not see any concrete actions by the U.S. authorities with regards to the Syrian crisis. Despite official statements, the White House's position on this issue is still unclear," said the expert.

The United States imposed sanctions against Syrian President Bashar Assad and six other senior officials of the country.

Barack Obama has ordered to freeze all their accounts, which may be in the US banks, and also banned U.S. citizens, companies and organizations to have any business relationship with sanctioned persons.

Syria has recently covered riots, demonstrators demanded the resignation of the country's leader Bashar Assad. According to authorities, the victims of the disorder are already about 80 people.

Syria has recently been covered by riots, the demonstrators demanded the resignation of the country's leader Bashar Assad. According to authorities, the riots have already killed about 80 people.

Since early 2011, the wave of popular unrests have covered a number of countries in the Middle East and North Africa, particularly Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen and Libya. Popular uprisings have led to the downfall of the ruling regimes in Egypt and Tunisia. Currently, a fierce struggle between the authorities and armed rebels continues in Libya.

According to Shenadi, U.S. foreign policy in the Arab countries would give a good result if it would not coincided with the beginning of a revolution in the Arab world.

"The policy of Obama, who lost on some aspects of domestic policy, could be rescued by foreign policy towards the Middle East. But the U.S. authorities did not expect this turn of events in the Arab world," he said.

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