...

Baku reserves right to respond should Turkey-Armenia flights open

Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict Materials 22 July 2011 16:36
"Azerbaijan does not interfere in the two countries' relations, but Baku reserves the right to respond in the case of an infringement in the country's national interests," First Secretary of the Foreign Ministry Spokesman Elman Abdullayev told Trend.
Baku reserves right to respond should Turkey-Armenia flights open

Azerbaijan, Baku, July 22 / Trend S.Agayeva/

"Azerbaijan does not interfere in the two countries' relations, but Baku reserves the right to respond in the case of an infringement in the country's national interests," First Secretary of the Foreign Ministry Spokesman Elman Abdullayev told Trend.

He made the statement while commenting on media reports about regular flights possibly opening along the Yerevan-Van route.

The Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry follows the further developments in the issue of opening the Yerevan-Van flights and will react depending on the further scenario, Abdullayev said.

Van Trade-Industry Chamber Council Chairman Abdullah Tuncdemir said the first Yerevan-Van flight maybe performed on Sept.11, the Armenian media reported.

"If everything runs on the schedule, the first flight, which will launch regular flights between Yerevan and Van, will be performed on Sept.11," he said

Tuncdemir leads a delegation of 30 businessmen from Van, who arrived in Yerevan.

"First, it is planned to open a charter flight. If all goes according to plan, we will begin direct flights from Yerevan to Van," the source
said

Diplomatic relations between Armenia and Turkey have been broken due to Armenia's claims of an alleged genocide, and its occupation of Azerbaijani lands. The border between them has been broken since 1993.

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. Armenian armed forces have occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan since 1992, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and 7 surrounding districts.

Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a ceasefire agreement in 1994. The co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group - Russia, France, and the U.S. - are currently holding the peace negotiations.

Armenia has not yet implemented the U.N. Security Council's four resolutions on the liberation of the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding regions.

Tags:
Latest

Latest