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Chechnya ex-police officer confesses role in Nemtsov killing

Other News Materials 8 March 2015 22:39 (UTC +04:00)
A former Chechen police officer has confessed to his involvement in the recent assassination of the high-profile Russian opposition figure, Boris Nemtsov, in Moscow.
Chechnya ex-police officer confesses role in Nemtsov killing

A former Chechen police officer has confessed to his involvement in the recent assassination of the high-profile Russian opposition figure, Boris Nemtsov, in Moscow, Press TV reported.

Zaur Dadayev, a former deputy commander for the Chechen police, admitted to his role in Nemtsov's murder after a Russian court on Sunday indicted him and Anzor Gubashev, who worked for a private security company in Moscow. Gubashev denied involvement.

"The participation of Dadayev is confirmed by his confession," said presiding judge, Nataliya Mushnikova.

The two men, both with Chechen origin, were arrested in the violence-plagued North Caucasus Republic of Ingushetia, which neighbors Chechnya, on Saturday.

However, no information has emerged about the possible motive behind the killing of the Russian opposition leader.

Russian investigators on Sunday said they have questioned five suspects in an inquiry to determine the motive for Nemtsov's killing.

The five suspects appeared in court on Sunday and were remanded in custody.

On February 27, Nemtsov, (shown below) a former deputy prime minister and an outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin, was shot dead as he was walking across a bridge in full view of the Kremlin and Red Square.

According to Nemtsov's lawyer, Vadim Prohorov, over the last few months the politician had started to receive death threats on social media sites.

The assassination came ahead of the annual spring opposition rally scheduled for March 1 in Moscow, which he was set to lead.

Nemtsov, 55, had co-chaired the pro-business Republican Party of Russia - People's Freedom Party (RPR-PARNAS) since 2012.

In the 1990s, he served as the first deputy prime minister under former president, Boris Yeltsin.

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