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Book dedicated to study of Karabakh conflict published in Moscow

Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict Materials 17 January 2011 17:20
The Moscow State University’s History Department’s faculty of the post-Soviet countries will publish a series of books devoted to the analysis of problems, and search for optimal models of post-conflict settlement in the South Caucasus, the Vestnik Kavkaza website reported.
Book dedicated to study of Karabakh conflict published in Moscow

The Moscow State University's History Department's faculty of the post-Soviet countries will publish a series of books devoted to the analysis of problems, and search for optimal models of post-conflict settlement in the South Caucasus, the Vestnik Kavkaza website reported.

The first title in the new series was the book "From Maiendorf to Astana: the fundamental aspects of the Armenian-Azerbaijani Nagorno-Karabakh conflict."

The very title of the book clearly defines the main theme of research on the most complex and multifaceted conflict in the former Soviet Union. Just the Karabakh conflict was largely a catalyst, which contributed to the rapid collapse of the Soviet Union as a state. In the articles, scholars and experts reveal much detail as the nuances of settlement of the conflict, its historical features, and possible prospects for future developments.

The book is written for a wide range of professionals in the fields of international relations and political science, all those interested in historical conflictological issues. The appendix to the book contains the basic international documents on the Armenian-Azerbaijani Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

The books of the Faculty and University's Information and Analytical Center for the Study of post-Soviet space will reflect views of scientists from Russia, Armenia, Georgia, Turkey, Iran and the EU and the United States to other conflict situations in the region. As is known, the truth is born only in scientific disputes, and reasonable compromise can be achieved only by this way. The ultimate objective of this must be the transformation of the South Caucasus in the common house, dominated by peace and mutual consent.

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. Armenian armed forces have occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan since 1992, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and 7 surrounding districts.

Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a ceasefire agreement in 1994. The co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group - Russia, France, and the United States - are currently holding the peace negotiations.

Armenia has not yet implemented the U.N. Security Council's four resolutions on the liberation of the Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding regions.

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