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Experts: Libya faces threat of terror elements

Arab World Materials 21 October 2011 18:38
After former leader Muammar Gaddafi’s death, Libya faces the threat of arms dissemination in the country’s cities and provinces, which can lead to the spread of terror elements, analyst for Middle East policy Hassan Attiyya believes.

Azerbaijan, Baku, Oct.21 / Trend, A. Taghiyeva /

After former leader Muammar Gaddafi's death, Libya faces the threat of arms dissemination in the country's cities and provinces, which can lead to the spread of terror elements, analyst for Middle East policy Hassan Attiyya believes.

"Arms used in fight with Gaddafi regime may pass into the hands of certain groups, who can use the situation in the country to spread terror elements," Attiyya told Trend over phone.

He said the National Transition Council of Libya plays the main role, which should take measures to ensure security in the country.

"One should not forget that tribal relations still exist in Libya, and if the National Transition Council will not be able to take matters into its own hands, civil war very likely to occur," Attiyya believes.

Gaddafi, who ruled Libya for 42 years, died in the city of Sirte, after he was captured by the National Transition Council's supporters. When the car, by which Gaddafi was being hospitalized, was moving it was caught in crossfire between the revolutionaries and Gaddafi forces in which he was hit by a bullet in the head.

According to another Arab politician Akram Khuzam, Gaddafi's full overthrow does not mean that stability and security will reign in Libya.

"Undoubtedly, the stabilization of the situation in the country will take a long period, and during this period it is not ruled out that Libya will face the problem of armed groups," Khuzam told Trend over phone.

He said to rebuild the country Libya first needs the help of developed Arab and European countries, who will help the country to recover the country's economy.

"Unlike other Arab countries suffering from the revolution and the stabilization of which took more time, Libya will receive the necessary support from other countries thanks to its natural resources," Khuzam beleives.

Mass demonstrations demanding for the ouster of Qaddafi, who has been ruling the country for more than 40 years, started in Libya in mid-February and subsequently grew into armed confrontation between the government forces and the rebels.

On March 17, the UN Security Council adopted a resolution envisaging no-fly zone over Libya. The operation of the coalition forces began on March 19. Later on, March 31, the NATO Commandment took over the campaign in Libya.

During the nearly nine months of combat operations Gaddafi regime opponents managed to establish control over the whole territory of Libya. In August, Gaddafi lost control of Tripoli.

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